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Italian Wines

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Discover the essence of Italian viticulture on our platform. From the rolling hills of Tuscany to the sun-drenched coasts of Sicily, shop our curated selection of Italian wines online. Embrace the tradition and passion encapsulated in each bottle. Whether you're in the mood for a velvety Barolo or a refreshing Pinot Grigio, find the perfect Italian wine to elevate your collection.


  • Umani Ronchi Montepulciano d’Abruzzo ‘Podere’ 2022

    (1)
    $21.70
    or $20.62 in case of 12 bottles.
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  • Mandoleto Pinot Grigio 2022

    (1)
    $17.05
    or $16.20 in case of 12 bottles.
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  • Kris Pinot Grigio IGT

    $23.25
    or $22.09 in case of 12 bottles.
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  • Alasia Moscato d'Asti 2022

    $27.76
    or $26.37 in case of 12 bottles.
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  • Vietti Moscato d'Asti 2023

    $46.41
    or $44.09 in case of 6 bottles.
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  • Bonacchi Chianti Riserva 2018

    $25.00
    or $23.75 in case of 12 bottles.
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  • Marcarini Moscato d'Asti 2022

    (1)
    $34.10
    or $32.40 in case of 12 bottles.
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  • Pala Soprasole Vermentino di Sardegna 2022 (formerly Pala Fiori)

    $25.34
    or $24.07 in case of 12 bottles.
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  • Massolino Moscato D'Asti DOC 2021

    $43.62
    or $41.44 in case of 6 bottles.
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  • Pala Stellato Vermentino di Sardegna 2021

    $39.99
    or $37.99 in case of 12 bottles.
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  • Tiefenbrunner Merus Pinot Grigio 2022

    (2)
    $36.66
    or $34.83 in case of 12 bottles.
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  • Borgo Maragliano La Caliera Moscato d’Asti DOCG (screwcap) 2022

    $30.62
    or $29.09 in case of 12 bottles.
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  • Morgante Nero d'Avola 2021

    (2)
    $38.75
    or $36.81 in case of 12 bottles.
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  • Mastroberardino Greco di Tufo DOCG 2021

    $44.66
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  • Monte Antico IGT 2019

    (1)
    $26.35
    or $25.03 in case of 12 bottles.
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  • Maretti Langhe Rosso DOC 2020

    $26.99
    or $25.64 in case of 12 bottles.
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  • Cantina Vietti Nebbiolo Perbacco Langhe DOC 2021

    $61.66
    or $55.49 in case of 6 bottles.
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  • Santadi Vermentino 'Villa Solais' 2022

    (1)
    $29.45
    or $27.98 in case of 12 bottles.
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  • Cantine Prà Soave Classico 'Otto" DOC 2021

    $39.15
    or $37.19 in case of 12 bottles.
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  • Pala Centosere Cannonau di Sardegna 2021 (Formerly Pala Fiori Cannonau)

    $29.99
    or $28.49 in case of 12 bottles.
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  • Toscolo Chianti DOCG 2020

    $21.99
    or $20.89 in case of 12 bottles.
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  • Castellari Bergaglio Gavi di Tassarolo DOCG 'Fornaci' 2021

    (1)
    $41.85
    or $39.76 in case of 6 bottles.
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  • Pietradolce Etna Rosso DOC ‘Archineri’ 2019

    $100.75
    or $95.71 in case of 6 bottles.
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  • Poliziano Chianti Colli Senesi DOCG 2022

    $33.33
    or $30.83 in case of 12 bottles.
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Italy's winemaking legacy spans thousands of years, with each region boasting its distinct characteristics and traditions. From the northern alpine terrains of Alto Adige to the southern volcanic soils of Campania, the country offers a vast palette of flavors and styles. One of Italy's most renowned wine regions, Tuscany, is Italy's winemaking legacy spans thousands of years, with each region boasting its distinct characteristics and traditions. From the northern alpine terrains of Alto Adige to the southern volcanic soils of Campania, the country offers a vast palette of flavors and styles. One of Italy's most renowned wine regions, Tuscany, is home to the famed Sangiovese grape, the primary constituent of Chianti and Brunello di Montalcino. Meanwhile, Piedmont in the northwest is celebrated for its robust and age-worthy Barolos and Barbarescos, made from the Nebbiolo grape. Further south, the island of Sicily brings forth wines made from indigenous grapes like Nero d'Avola and Grillo, reflecting the island's rich history and multicultural influences. The diversity in Italy's wine offerings is not just about grape varieties but also the winemaking methods. While some producers adhere to age-old traditions, others embrace modern techniques, resulting in wines that are both innovative and reflective of their terroir. This harmonious blend of old and new, tradition and innovation, has solidified Italy's position as a wine powerhouse, offering bottles that resonate with both connoisseurs and novices. read more... less

Frequently Asked Questions

What Is Italian Wine?

Italy is the largest wine-producing country, making 30% more wine than the number two and three spots, Spain and France. Italy is also amongst the most prominent wine consumers and exporters. Italy is a synonym for wine, and Italian wine has no equal in terms of variety, quality and prestige. Italy is home to hundreds of unique wine grapes not found anywhere else, so Italian wine is hard to replicate. For the real deal, you must try what comes out of the country’s cellars, and that’s quite an adventure.   Italian wine can be red, white or rosé; dry, semi-sweet or dessert-like; still or bubbly. There’s an Italian wine for every palate, budget and occasion. Let’s talk about the most popular Italian wines and how to find the best wines for you.

What Are the Most Popular Italian Wines?

The most famous wines in Italy vary depending on what you’re looking for. For age-worthy red wines, those from Piedmont, made with Nebbiolo, or the many expressions of Sangiovese, in Tuscany, are a great start. For crisp white wines, few regions are so dependable as Veneto, Friuli and the Trentino Alto Adige. Even warm southern Italy is the source of striking white and red wine.  The most popular Italian wines are often labelled as DOCG; they’re the best of the best. Of course, there is good wine at the DOC and IGT levels, and they’re rarely as pricey as DOCG wines. 

What Are the Different Types of Italian Wine?

Italian wine can be classified by region, as all twenty regions in the country produce wine. Some regions, such as Tuscany, Piedmont and Sicily, have gained recognition for full-bodied red wines. Still, even these regions produce white wine.  Interestingly, Italian wine styles are often compatible with the food typical of their region. Wine and food are two sides of the same coin, and that’s particularly true for Italy.  For sparkling wine, look for Prosecco. For a nice red, Barolo, Chianti and Brunello di Montalcino are worthy of memorable occasions. And then we have all types of wine for everyday enjoyment, from wine from Sardinia to that made up on the foothills of the Alps. 

Are Italian Wines Expensive?

Most Italian wine is not expensive, as it is part of people's diet. Everyday wine in Italy is as good as any, but the most memorable wines, those from prestigious sites, can undoubtedly be expensive. Brunello di Montalcino, Barolo, Barbaresco, Amarone Della Valpolicella, Franciacorta and the famous Super Tuscans are among the best and most notorious Italian wines. They’re on the expensive side. Fair value wine comes from every Italian region, but Chianti, Valpolicella, Montepulciano d’Abruzzo and the wines coming from Sicily and Sardinia are also well priced and spectacular. 

What Are the Best Italian Wines?

The best Italian wines depend on what you need. Robust red wines, sparkling wines or dessert wines. The country has it all. To ensure you get the good stuff, source wine at the DOC and DOCG levels. However, wine at IGT levels is often good for casual get-togethers. To find the best Italian wines, explore our collection at World Wine. The best source of Italian wine in Australia.