Gunderloch Rothenberg Riesling Trockenbeerenauslese 2004 375ml

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ws98

Wine Spectator – Incredible unctuousness, while the aroma signals wet earth and mineral notes. Silky-smooth, it remains light on the palate, leaving the essence of apricot, honey and spice flavors, which fade gracefully on the long finish. Drink now through 2050.

jr18/20

Jancis Robinson – Great concentration of botrytis on the nose, there's some BA and TBA fruit in here. Toffee apple, honey, orange and grapefruit set a frame of complexity. A rich oily texture is offset by faint notions of acidity and Mandarin Napoleon orange bitterness. Luscious and generous.

About This Wine

The Rothenberg Vineyard encompasses around 20 hectares directly on the Rhine River on the north end of the “Roter Hang” between Nackenheim and Nierstein. Around five hectares of this represent the heart of the Rothenberg. The vineyard has a slope of 30 to 80% and comprises 290-million-year-old red shale plates. The Hasselbach family of Gunderloch own around 4.5 hectares of this prime vineyard made up predominantly of very steep parcels. The Nackenheimer Rothenberg is without question their most prominent vineyard mountain. It yields wines of striking mineral character paired with a broad spectrum of expressive spice and fruit aromas.

Type White Wine
Varietal(s) Riesling
Country Germany
Region Reinhessen
Brand Gunderloch
Vintage 2004

About German Wines

Germany is the world’s northernmost fine wine producing region and thus requires its vines to endure some of the coldest temperatures. Fortunately, the country’s star variety, Riesling, does well in cooler climates and can survive even these freezing winters.

Germany Riesling is classified by ripeness at harvest which is also used to indicate the wine’s level of residual sugar. Picking earlier means the grapes have less time to ripen and the corresponding wines will be on the drier side; while picking later gives the grapes the opportunity full ripen and produce a lusciously sweet Riesling. The classifications from driest to sweetest: Kabinett, Spätlese, Auslese, Beerenauslese, Trockenbeerenauslese and Eiswein (ice wine). While not as common to age white wines outside of Chardonnay, top tier German Rieslings can be aged for decades.

Other notable white grape varieties produced in Germany include Müller-Thurgau (a cross between Riesling and Madelaine Royale in the search for varieties that could withstand the extreme temperatures), Grauburguner (Pinot Gris) and Weissburguner (Pinot Blanc). The cooler German climate leads to earlier harvesting in general and gives German wines a distinctive character of higher acidity.

Historically red wine has always been harder to produce in the German climate. However, Pinot Noir grown in slightly warmer pockets of the country, has been highly successful in recent times. Going by the German name, Spätburgunder, German Pinot Noir can be elegant, structured and have vibrant acidity.

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